I think nature is wise because it doesn’t recognize borders—at least not those created by people. 

Consider the Sonoran Desert. It exists where it does because of its geography, climate and all the other natural forces that shape every distinct habitat found on Earth. All the different life forms that reside in the Sonoran Desert today have evolved over long periods of time to thrive and coexist in their unique desert home. 

The Sonoran Desert encompasses more than 120,000 square miles, of which more than half are located in Mexico and the remainder in the United States. Biologists recognize the Sonoran Desert as the most biodiverse of all deserts, with more than 3,000 plant species and nearly 800 vertebrate animal species. The plants and animals daily lives and their ultimate survival are linked by their mutual dependence on one another. In nature, the healthiest and most resilient communities are those rich in diversity–where every member is strengthened by the presence of all others. 

The same, I believe, is true for human communities. 

The Sonoran Desert, in addition to its extra-ordinary natural biodiversity, also encompasses an amazing array of human diversity. It is home to 17 indigenous communities, a portion of two American states, and also a portion of three Mexican states. As such, the Sonoran Desert is a land of many cultures woven together into one thriving community. 

Looked at through this lens, we live in just one desert that crosses different borders, and we are all part of one community that embodies many different languages and traditions. This cultural diversity is our greatest strength as citizens of the Sonoran Desert. 

Nature reminds us every day how important it is for us to live together, in harmony, with one another and the natural world that sustains us all. 

Nature is indeed wise.